Have you signed up for a workshop? Don’t miss out!

PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS THE 2015 WORKSHOP SCHEDULE. THE 2016 WORKSHOP SCHEDULE WILL BE POSTED SOON!

One of the great experiences for students taking part in National Capital History Day is the chance to participate in some incredible workshops. This year’s schedule includes chances for students to learn about art history, Aboriginal history, archaeology, journalism, music history, research abroad and what it’s like to study history at university.

All registered students should have received an email from NCHD’s Erin Gurski, who is coordinating the workshop schedule, about how to sign up for their preferred session. If you haven’t done that, be sure to email us at ottawahistoryday[at]gmail.com as soon as possible!

And if you’re a teacher or parent attending NCHD, you are welcome in our workshops, too. To minimize disruptions, we request that once you enter a workshop, you stay for its duration and that you not enter a workshop that is already in session.

We want to thank all of our workshop leaders for taking time out of their busy schedules to join us.

Here’s this year’s lineup:

9 AM-10 AM — WORKSHOP A
DEADLINE HISTORY: A JOURNALIST COVERS THE PAST
A secret memo, unearthed after 40 years in the national archive, that gave birth to the Canadian flag. The where- abouts of a long-lost Aboriginal burial ground rediscovered — on the grounds of the Canadian Museum of History! New light on mysteries surrounding John A. Macdonald’s birthplace in Scotland, the earliest known hockey game in Canada and a fossil fish with the beginning of limbs — a stunning symbol of the moment millions of years ago when some animals began moving from ocean to land. As a senior writer with Postmedia News, Randy Bo-swell pioneered a national “history news” beat that produced edgy stories about Canada’s past — from political history to archeology — for daily newspapers and websites across the country, including the Ottawa Citizen and the Toronto-based National Post.
HOST: Randy Boswell, now an assistant professor at Carleton University’s School of Journalism and Communication, writes for Postmedia News as a freelance journalist.

What's it like to write about history — on deadline? Join Randy Boswell's workshop to find out.

What’s it like to write about history — on deadline? Join Randy Boswell’s workshop to find out.

9:05 AM-10:05 AM — WORK- SHOP B
ABORIGINAL HISTORY: AN INTERACTIVE TIMELINE
Sometimes, history is best taught and under- stood when we leave our desks and try to see the past in a new light. This workshop uses blankets as a visual representation of land, with participants representing the First Peoples. Step onto a blanket and step back in time to better understand such complex issues as colonization and resistance, and start a dialogue about how they shaped the Canada we know today. This workshop takes participants on an emotional journey but concludes with a debrief and an op- portunity to discuss how we can repair our fractured relationship as Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada.
HOST: KAIROS Canada, Katy Quinn, Sara Anderson and colleagues.

9:30 AM-10:30 AM — WORKSHOP C (TOUR)
FUN IN THE FONDS: LISTENING TO TH VOICES IN PRIMARY DOCUMENTS
Archives are great resources for documents and objects that can be used as primary resources. Archives and Research Collections (ARC) at Carleton University is home to many different types of primary resources. There are rare books going back more than 500 years that demonstrate the evolution of printing, a magician’s library and ephemera as well as old photographs, newspapers, and yearbooks going back to the 1940s that reflect student activities … you’ll even find architectural sketches and drawings that became nationally recognized build- ings. Go behind the scenes for a hands- on experience with fascinating books and interesting archival material.
HOST: Dr. Lloyd Keane is the Archives and Rare Book Coordinator for the Carleton University Library. He holds a PhD in Psychoanalytic Studies from the University of Essex and has research interests in esoteric religions, analytical psychology, and general theories of spatial relations.

9:40-10:40 AM — WORKSHOP D
IN THE TRENCHES OF HISTORY: ARCHAEOLOGY IN OTTAWA
Archaeology is not just for Indiana Jones — a lot of it is taking place in Carleton University’s own back yard. Join this workshop to learn more about some of the many local digs that are underway right now, what archaeologists are unearthing, and what their findings tell us about people of the past.
HOST: National Capital Commission archaeologist Ian Badgley specializes in northern archaeology and cultural adaptations. He has worked for various educational institutions, consulting firms and Aboriginal organizations and has completed research in Canada’s arctic and subarctic regions.

9:45 AM-10:45 AM — WORKSHOP E
HISTORY OR MEMORY?
Are commemorations of the War of 1812, of the First World War (1914- 1918), or of the Death of Charlemagne (814) history? What is the difference between memory and history? This workshop will examine the place and use of the past in our societies. Come and discover how history explains, and memory reveals, past realities.
HOST: Professor Andrew Gaiero, University of Ottawa.

9:50 AM-11 AM — WORKSHOP F (TOUR)
HOW DOES CONTEMPORARY ART AND HISTORY INTERSECT? A HANDS-ON TOUR AND DISCUSSION
Come to the Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG) for a tour of our current exhibition, Human Nature. Playing on the idea of human nature as a force that ex- ploits and innovates, creates and destroys, the artists explore a range of such critical issues as food production, habitat loss, dystopian futures, and natural disaster. We’ll look at art works by artists who en- gage with local and international histories, from Aboriginal identity to Iranian culture, and using a range of materials from paint and video to fully immersive environments. Come learn how contemporary artists use history as a starting point to ask questions about consequences, memory and environmental responsibility.
HOST: Fiona Wright is the Education and Community Outreach Manager at the Carleton University Art Gallery.

9:55 A.M.-10:55 A.M. — WORKSHOP G
UN MANUSCRIT INÉDIT DE LA NOUVELLE-FRANCE : LES LETTRES CANADIENNES (1700-1725)
Connaissez-vous la Nouvelle-France? Samuel de Champlain, peut-être? Eh bien, aux 17e et 18esiècles, la Nou- velle-France est une colonie française formée de l’Acadie, du Canada (Qué- bec et Ontario) et d’une version géante de la Louisiane: sur papier, le tiers de l’Amérique du Nord! Bien sûr, religieux et explorateurs ont raconté leurs rencontres avec les Premières Nations et leurs découvertes géographiques. Leurs livres ont même eu beaucoup de succès à Paris jusqu’en 1770. Mais qu’arrive-t-il quand on trouve, aujourd’hui, un manuscrit français des années 1700-1725 qui n’a jamais été publié? Imaginez: 1500 pages à la main! En plus, son titre est vraiment étonnant: Les lettres canadiennes! C’est pourtant ce qui m’est arrivé et, main- tenant, il faut l’éditer. Je vous propose donc une présentation du mystérieux manuscrit, suivie d’un exercice de lecture et de transcription. Voilà un beau sujet de recherche, entre histoire et littérature, qui prouvera que les livres ne poussent pas dans les arbres!
HOST: Sébastien Côté, Département de français, Université Carleton.

10 AM-11 AM — WORKSHOP H
THE SOUND OF MUSIC: FROM ANOTHER TIME
If you’ve never heard of an ocarina, a djembe or a bodhran, this workshop will introduce you to these instruments as well as many others. Take a musical journey to the mountains of Appalachia to hear a courting dulcimer, to the outback of Australia to listen to the drone of the didgeridoo, and kick up your heels to the Celtic sound of an old tin whistle. And you don’t have to be a musician to take part in a “hands-on” session during which you can try some of these unique period instruments. This workshop will cover everything from drums to strings to acorn tops as it illuminates not only the musical past of our ancestors around the world, but also how and where you may hear echoes of these instruments in modern music.
HOST: Arthur McGregor is the owner and founder of the Ottawa Folklore Centre and has been performing on various instruments since he was 12. An accomplished musician and songwriter, he is also a founding director of the Canadian Folk Music Awards and recently received the Estelle Klein Award, which honours the work of an individual or group that has made significant contributions to Ontario’s folk music community.

10 AM-11 AM — WORKSHOP I
WALKING IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF HISTORY: YOUNG HISTORIANS OVERSEAS
Just over 100 years ago, Canada found itself at war. In August 1914, when the First World War began, no one knew of the horrors that would ensue. Young men from across the country – some only teenagers – joined their fellow Canadians and travelled overseas. Over 600,000 soldiers enlisted in the war, including 20,000 who were un- derage, and they fought, were wounded, and died at places like Ypres, Vimy Ridge, and Passchendaele. The Vimy Foundation is a Canadian charity that works to ensure that the legacy of the First World War is not forgotten. Each year, the Foundation awards high school students trips to visit the battlefields and cemeteries of Europe. In this session, you will hear from some of the alumni of these programs, who will share with you the stories of the soldiers, the experience of visiting historical sites in person – literally walking in the footsteps of history, and the importance of Remembrance.
HOST: Jennifer Jones, Communications Coordinator for the Vimy Foundation and students Michael Gorley and Hicham El Bayadi.

WORKSHOP H-Vimy

10 AM-11 AM — WORKSHOP J
(THIS IS AN OPEN WORKSHOP. PARTICIPANTS MAY ENTER WHILE THIS IS IN PROGRESS)

(Hi)STORYTELLinG
Can we take historical films seriously? How about plays? Novels? And documentaries? This workshop explores the intersection of history and storytelling with some of the people behind the Montreal- based Roots and Recipes documentary project, and Staging Our Histories, an upcoming performance event in Ottawa. We’ll get you thinking about what history is, how we share it, and what it means to find history off the page.
HOST: Rebecca Lessard is a founding member and filmmaker for Roots and Recipes, a project that brings together first- and second-generation immigrants to explore their histories through food. Elise Gauthier is a bilingual actor, creator, local tour guide, and participant in Stag- ing our Histories. They will be joined by Sinead Cox and Arpita Bajpeyi, two of three co-founders and directors of Stag- ing Our Histories, an Ottawa event that will bring together seven performers to share the histories close to them with the public in different ways.

10 AM-11 AM — WORKSHOP K
(THIS IS AN OPEN WORKSHOP. PARTICIPANTS MAY ENTER WHILE THIS IS IN PROGRESS)
THE REAL DIRT ON STUDYING HISTORY
Meet some of Carleton’s history undergrads and hear what it’s like to study history at the post-secondary level. What are the courses you can take? How big is the leap from high-school history to a first-year university course? And what kind of job can you get with a history degree, anyway?
HOSTS: Hollis Peirce, Victoria Hawkins and Shannon Ford.

10:05 AM-11:05 AM
WORKSHOP L (REPEAT OF WORKSHOP B)
ABORIGINAL HISTORY — AN INTERACTIVE TIMELINE
Sometimes, history is best taught and understood when we leave our desks and try to see the past in a new light. This workshop uses blankets as a visual representation of Canadian geography, with participants representing the First Peoples. Step onto a blanket and step back in time to better understand such complex issues as colonization and resistance, and start a dialogue about how they shaped the Canada we know today. This workshop takes participants on an emotional journey but concludes with an opportunity to express thoughts and feelings in a talking circle.
HOSTS: KAIROS Canada, Katy Quinn, Sara Anderson and colleagues.

Take a step back in time in our interactive workshop about Aboriginal history. Photo courtesy KAIROS Canada.

Take a step back in time in our interactive workshop about Aboriginal history. Photo courtesy KAIROS Canada.

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