It’s all about history

One of the things we try to do at National Capital History Day is demonstrate how history intersects with other disciplines. And often that crossroads can produce some interesting results.

At this year’s event, you’ll find opportunities to explore art history, archaeology, Aboriginal history, journalism and archival work. Most of these experiences take place through our student workshops, but open your ears as well as your eyes outside the workshops, too.

Caitlyn Acheson (pictured top left) and Tom Henbest (bottom right) work as historical interpreters at Upper Canada Village in Morrisburg, Ontario.

Caitlyn Acheson (pictured top left) and Tom Henbest (bottom right) work as historical interpreters at Upper Canada Village in Morrisburg, Ontario.

This year we’ll be joined by two historical interpreters from Upper Canada Village, one of Canada’s biggest living history sites. Tom Henbest and Caitlyn Acheson will be performing music from the 19th century. But they’re not just performers — they also study the music they’re playing and singing to try to present it in the most accurate way possible. By researching, preparing and performing songs and dances of the 1860s, they aim to animate music of the past.

Caitlyn studies musical theatre at St. Lawrence College in Brockville and Tom studies music and mathematics at Queen’s University in Kingston — watch (and listen!) for them today. They’ll be strolling through the River Building and will be happy to answer any questions you may have about their music.

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